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Daam Dah 2018 kilnformed glass, 23.5ct gold leafH:14cm W:13.5cm D:7.5cm

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Daam Dah 2018 kilnformed glass, 23.5ct gold leafH:8cm W:14cm D:14cm

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Daam Dah 2018 kilnformed glass, 23.5ct gold leafH:7cm W:7cm D:8cm

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Korean Glass 2017 blown glass and ceramic parts from English manufactured teapots H:17cm W:15.50cm D:15.50 cm

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Korean Glass 2017 blown glass and ceramic parts from English manufactured teapots

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Korean Glass 2017 blown glass and ceramic parts from English manufactured teapots H:20cm W:20cm

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Arabic glass

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The Korean Glass

Originally from South Korea, Choi Keeryong came to Britain to complete a Master of Design at Edinburgh College of Art and in 2010, continued to embark on a PhD in Glass and Architectural Glass. Keeryong has exhibited widely across the UK whilst investigating the similarities and differences between cultural groups in terms of their aesthetic perceptions of visual experiences, particularly in relation to unfamiliar materials and surface imagery.

Choi’s motivation for creating this body of work is to explore how the ambiguity of an individual’s cultural interpretation can help to create the state of “uncanni-ness” in the audience’s visual experiences. He believes that this “uncanni-ness” provokes emotions and feelings and Choi manipulates this powerful tool within his artistic practice to promote the awareness of stereotypes in an individual’s cultural understanding.

Developing inlaid colouring techniques inspired by the ancient Korean “Saggam” pottery allows him to explore the state of ambiguity in visual experience by delineating geometric patterns and counterfeit letters onto glass artworks and encapsulating them in between the layers of transparent glass. The use of historical symbolism of tea and the popularity of English manufactured ceramic teapots are the metaphor for the cultural stereotype in both West and East.

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Leathered Bowl, Leather, Lacquered 275 x 275 x 430 mm 2017

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Leathered Bowl, Leather, Lacquered 2017

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Leathered Bowl, Leather, Lacquered 405 x 310 x 165 mm 2017

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Leathered Bowl, Leather, Lacquered 620 x 300 x 100 mm 2017

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Leathered Bowl, Leather, Lacquered 370 x 250 x 150 mm 2017

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Leathered Bowl, Leather, Lacquered 240 x 210 x 115 mm 2017

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Leathered Bowl, Leather, Lacquered 2017

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Leathered Bowl, Leather, Lacquered 400 x 340 x 100 mm 2017

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Slice of Life , Leather, Lacquered 240 x 240 x 170 mm 2017

There are many things that are made of leather. Some of them protect our body like clothes and shoes, and others provide a function such as bags. Soft and durable leather offers reliable protection against damage from sharp or abrasive objects.

Craftsmen are specialists in materials. I majored in metal works and was exposed to leather in the process of making various crafts. I was immediately fascinated. I used to mix metal and leather at first, but recently I have concentrated on using only leather.

The series of “Leathered Bowls” is completed by rolling up cut leather strings into a certain shape and lacquering the surface. The pattern is made by winding a short unit of leather strings into a round shape and lines are added until it gradually spreads.

The set of lines create the outer structure that can expand spatially and form the “bowl”. This process is like the growth of plants and animals that adapt to changes in their external environment.

Each shape develops its own identity from the passage of time and unexpected events. The pattern made by the gathering of leather strings is like a growth ring of a tree that has been produced by repeated changes in temperature over many years. The Leathered Bowl, which is made of leather and completed with lacquer, is a vessel that conveys life.

Junsu Kim

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Vases, stoneware, 2018

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Figures from drawing, stoneware, 2016

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Figures become patterns, pigment on canvas, Figures from drawing, stoneware, 2016

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Figures become patterns, pigment on canvas, Figures from drawing, stoneware, 2016

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Figures from drawing, stoneware, 2016, 18x12x57 / 45x12x50 /

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Figures from drawing, stoneware, 2016, 23x13x54 / 20x13x51

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When objects are viewed with pure sense, they are just bodies in a space. To see things with pure sense means that it removes the notional existence of them and their individuality. In that moment, everything from bodies to light and shadow becomes an expanded image.

In my paintings, I express the way bodies are looked under the pure sense. And I extract some parts of the paintings to make new forms.

​ Although no words can be defined as the beauty in its process, my intention is to make new forms by bringing out the lines and the colors from already existing figures.

Gippeum Roh







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