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dotnamul, 2013, 130 x 160 cm

Images between reality and non-reality > visually parallel universe BY YEONJU SUNG Series of Wearable Food works have been started with a discovery of an unexpected character of food ingredients. Ingredients seen from a different perspective are reconstructed and reassembled, and become a part of 'clothes' objet, which has a total different character and form. The moment of the transformation that is also a boundary of real and non-real, is captured as one peaceful photograph.

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cheese, 2012, 80 x 106 cm

This visually equal and parallel scene holds the mixture of reality (the raw, the original image file) and the modified image (modification made before and after printing) that becomes another real existence by being mixed up with the real food ingredients. Then the thing becomes a Photoshop file to become a final image of photograph that is a visually peaceful image, a ‘visually parallel universe.'

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chamwe, 2013, 70 x 60 cm

However, the parallel character of the reborn image can only be held visually. Inside the flat image of photograph, a various characters, forms of elements get along together subtly, or gently clash and coexist. Although each content maintains its own trait, their identity is not achieved and they exist for other contents. They look as if they coexist, but they are just floating together.

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Winter Mushroom

This series of her work forces viewers to defy the actual meaning, the functionalities, and the aspects of what clothing signifies in our lives. The essence of clothing and food has been reinterpreted. Each element does not fulfill its own role and yet, each suggests an unconventional and even contradicting role – un-wearable clothing that is made out of the materials that do not last.

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Winter Mushroom

through a combination of tactile, edible mediums —pasta, fruits, and vegetables— and fine art photography, the series depicts, with tactile beauty, clothing forms made from altered and recombined edibles and presented as photographic prints and projections. ‘second nature: new work’ by yeonju sung expands the artist exploration of material and process. Deploying animated forms, high contrast textures, and bright, bubblegum colors, whilestill exploring deeper themes, sung’s practice questions the distinction between the real and the virtually real.

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In between of unlimited duplication and transformation, reality and non-reality, there is an ambiguous play that shows us the unstable and inadequate conscience of contemporary people who live in this visual-centered environment where they consume images lightly.

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sikeumchi, 2013, 100 x 100 cm

‘I would arrange this material into photo-ready patterns that mimicked the patterns on textiles and printed fabrics, and I would photograph the results. but then, I started printing these photographs and reincorporated the prints back into my sculptural objects, thereby combining the digital print, with the real thing.’ comments sung. ‘I then photographed this hybrid real and virtual object, printed the new version, and repeated the process. It came to a point where, in spite of appearing to be real edible material, the majority of the object was actually made of digital prints.’

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Eggplant

Sung Yeonju was born in Korea in 1986 and graduated from the Hong Ik University in 2010. This work is from the series, Wearable Foods, in which she makes garments out of food and photographs them. As a fine artist, she fell in love with photography as a main tool and a medium to create her visions. ‘Wearable Foods’ is the first long term project she started two years ago and it still continues to this day.

Yeonju Sung

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Jungsik is the first Korean restaurant in history to receive not one but two Michelin stars. This Tribeca outpost headed by Jung Sik Yim brings together refined and modern techniques with the bold flavors of Korea.

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October 2, 2013- That mysterious Korean restaurant on Harrison and Hudson, that never seems to have people inside, has quickly become one of the best restaurants in the country. The 2014 Michelin book gave it two stars.

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The perfect treat for a sweet-toothed loved one: our brand new dessert tasting menu from the very talented Eunji Lee, now available every evening from 5pm at Jungsik New York.

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An unusual but exquisite combination - wasabi and strawberry jam macarons

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The most succulent tuna and rice, wrapped in the crispiest kim. This is not your ordinary kimbap

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KoreaNYC Gala Dinner at Jungsik, New York World's 50 Best Restaurants

Jungsik is a Korean restaurant launched by a chef who studied and worked in the U.S. and Spain. The restaurant introduces a new concept of Korean cuisine, offering new items that break away from the stereotypes of Korean cooking with avant-garde presentation and cooking methods and ingredients that are a mixture of Korean and Western styles. The restaurant offers a five-course lunch and a 9-course dinner for a unique Korean fine dining experience. Also worth a try are the new dishes that are introduced on a regular basis. Group reservations are available for up to 50 people.

Jungsik New York

Abalons and Nori(seaweed), photo Jenny van Sommers

The Good Life Aquatic Chef David Chang's Marine Muses

The South Korean female sea divers known as haenyeo comb the beds of the East China Sea for conch, abalone and uni—prized items on western menus. New York-based, Korean-American chef David Chang of Momofuku restaurant fame explains the unique characteristics of these deep-sea delicacies.



Dried and uni(sea urchins), photo Jenny van Sommers



Conch shell and napa cabbage, photo Jenny van Sommers

David Chang  (Chang Seok-ho, born August 5, 1977) is a noted Korean-American chef. He is chef/founder of the Momofuku restaurant group, which includes Momofuku Noodle Bar, Momofuku Ssäm Bar, Má Pêche, Milk Bar and Momofuku Ko in New York City, Momofuku Seiōbo in Sydney, Australia and the Momofuku Toronto restaurants Momofuku Noodle Bar (TO), Nikai, Daishō and Shōtō.

In 2009 Ko was awarded 2 Michelin stars, which it still maintains. Chang attended Georgetown Prep and then Trinity College, where he majored in religious studies. Chang later attended the French Culinary Institute (FCI) in New York City.

Momofuku







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