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Soft monument 1 2008, Acrylic on canvas

Unlike the usual solid monuments, several paintings depict them as something cushiony and indefinite. The inscriptions on them are mostly worn and illegible or covered as well. Looking into the almost invisible writings, they are no more than meaningless slogans which are ill fit for the monuments. As a scathing satire for the absurdity and recklessness of human beings, the finger humans strive to peruse the texts as if the trivial slogans had a great deal of worth or particular secrets

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Soft monument 2 2008, Acrylic on canvas

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Soft monument 3 2008, Acrylic on canvas

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Soft monument 4 2008, Acrylic on canvas

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Soft monument 5 2008, Acrylic on canvas

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Fishing the flat 2007, Acrylic on canvas

The finger-like characters are a type of visionary and futuristic human beings, with an excessive revolution or regression in the very end organs (hands or fingers) as subjects for impulsive and reckless behaviors. Though looking odd, they manage and control their world as Creator does. They create pseudo-nature imitating the real one, and make up an artificial paradise on their own through an array of actions like cutting, pasting ,sewing, etc.

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Folding surface 2, 2010, Acrylic on canvas

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Spring surface, 2010, Acrylic on canvas

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Folding mountain, 2010, Acrylic on canvas

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Undone 2 , 2012, Acrylic on canvas

One of my friends who is a teacher, posed to her elementary schoolers a question What makes a painting good? A variety of ideas were answered and I had a chance to see the papers. They said, it needs sincerity, personal characteristics, or it should be something the painter likes. Among them was a noticeable answer that perfectly fits into my idea. It says that a good painting is completed with no give-up of ones own idea.

It sounds quite simple, but that has never been easy to me. The depiction of an idea as exactly as an artist wants it to be, seems to be far from being easy, due to the inherent elusiveness. Sometimes I feel like taking a detour but it always ends up with restarting from the scratch. No matter how much time it takes, it seems desirable to face a problem squarely. To fulfill my own needs like scratching an itchy spot, is one of my reasons of painting.

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BLOOM 2012, 9.5 in x 6.5 in x 6.5 in (H), 50 lb, 100 lb Mono Filament

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BLOOM 2013, 6.25 in x 6 in x 3.5 in (H), 50 lb, 100 lb Mono Filament

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BLOOM 2014, 10 in x 8 in x 6 in (H), 50 lb, 100 lb Mono Filament

My work involves creating 3-dimensional organic forms mostly in generic and biomorphic shapes. Through these forms, I attempt to express seemingly static yet dynamic characteristics of our evolving lives. While they resemble transitions and transformations of nature, the forms are also to capture subtle but continuous changes in our emotions, sentiments, memories and expectations.

I weave and connect traces and tracks of the subtle changes into organic forms. The organic forms are made with mass-produced industrial materials, in particular Monofilament and Cable Ties. They are non –durable, disposable, trivial, inexpensive and easily consumed materials. But, when I weave and connect them, they are transformed into organic visualizations. I want them to be creating lasting moments, evoking and encapsulating our precious thoughts.

I often find these moments from nature. I think nature allows us to pause and find things that have been overlooked and are inspiring. Nature provides me with rooms to find breakthroughs and answers, and gives me time to ponder into thoughts. Through my work, I want to bring to our attention the moments that nature allows us to find and look back. I present nature in abstract porous ways so that they can be filled with our moments.

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URBAN SHELL , May 2011 Filed under Installation, Design, Mono Filament, Basketry

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URBAN SHELL , May 2011 Filed under Installation, Design, Mono Filament, Basketry

Sui Park is a New York based artist and an interior architect born in Seoul, Korea. Her work involves creating 3-dimensional flexible organic forms of a comfortable ambiance that are yet dynamic and possibly mystical or illusionary.

She recently had a solo exhibition ‘Playing with Perception’ at the Denise Bibro Fine Gallery in Chelsea, New York in April 2016. She also had a solo exhibition ‘Garden of Humans’ at Kingsborough Community College, CUNY, Brooklyn, NY in March 2016. She participated over 50 exhibitions, including a recent exhibition, ‘Repsychling’ in Brooklyn, NY in November.

Sui Park’s education includes MDes in Interior Architecture at Rhode Island School of Design in 2013 and BFA in Environmental Design at Maryland Institute College of Art in 2011. Sui Park also has MFA and BFA in Fiber Art at Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

Sui Park

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If the skin has emotion 2011 72.5 x 60.5 cm

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If the skin has emotion 2011 oil on canvas 65.5 x 53 cm

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If the skin has emotion 2014, 145.5 x 112 cm

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If the skin has emotion 2015 145.5 x 112 cm

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If the skin has emotion 2015 162 x 224 cm

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If the skin has emotion 2013 oil on canvas 145.5 x 97 cm

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If the skin has emotion 2014, Oil on canvas, 162 x 112 cm







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