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Designed by the architect`s office TUNEplanning, the multi-storey lounge bar in Seoul, Korea, was completed in 2013. Dayang Sanghoi was planned as an exhibition hall at first, but later it was created as a private lounge through several changes of plan.

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The generous expanse offers space for a stage on a mezzanine and can be used for client’s leisure and party with acquaintances. The architects had to build the house a ground up high with embarkment because of the high and slope topography and the surrounded mountain Bukhansan. Nature announces its presence everywhere in the house. The ceiling shows plywood rings which are reiterated by the winding lines of the oak.

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The space was designed to put nature at the forefront of visitors’ experience, a natural rock wall provides the backdrop for a seated bar and a pine tree descends from the upper mezzanine into the heart of the lounge. Paired with the polished concrete floors and lightly-stained wooden furniture, the organic material in Dayang Sanghoi offers a gentle, relaxing ambiance.

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TUNEplanning have utilised the uneven topography of the Pyeongchang-dong region in Seoul, Korea, to build a space that magnifies the scale of its surrounding mountain, creating a safe haven from the city’s bustling atmosphere.

The building was planned as an exhibition hall at first, but was later created as a private lounge through several changes of plan including the office, company training centre, studio, restaurant and cafe. Appropriately dubbed Dayang Sanghoi (Dayang meaning Diversity in Korean), this venue was designed to comfortably hold a variety of diverse events.

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Having seamlessly integrated a plethora of natural elements into the final building, Dayang Sanghoi features a giant natural rock, open plan flooring and heavy pine elements. Above all, the space was designed to put nature at the forefront of visitors’ experience.

A natural rock wall provides the backdrop for a seated bar and a pine tree descends from the upper mezzanine into the lounge. Even the furniture was placed haphazardly, as though formed by nature and without any intentional plan.

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Project description Pyeongchang-dong at the northern end of Jongro-gu, Pyeongchang was warehouse of Seonhyecheong, a government office which had managed receipt and disbursement of rice, cloth and coin used as means of tax payment in Joseon Dynasty, under the name of Daidongmi, Daidongpo and Daidongjeon each.

As its name derived from Pyeongchang tells, this area had to build a ground up high with embarkment because of its high and slope topography as a village of power and wealth. At the end of the road, we can meet an interesting alley leading to a house of Pyeongchang-dong along the winding ridge of mountain Bukhansan edge which shows the views one by one.

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Huge rockwall of this house 'The piano was drinking, not me' introduced on this magazine in Aug. 2009, is assimilating with nature while accumulating time with rain and wind as if it has been located there originally. Window and wall sloped obliquely stagger zigzag as they are drunk on nature like tipsy voice and lyrics of Tom Waits' song, 'The piano has been drinking, not me'. Whole space was embraced by metaphorical expression whether the wall is sloped or I am sloped. The designer created underground space of this house newly over the years.

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Rocky mountain in the middle of Jongno-gu, heart of Seoul. Mountain is nothing but mountain in the distance. However, it becomes an object of faith when it spreads in front of people. The mountain Bukhansan formed by granites adapting to the times may be one of mountains which have such an energy.

Bukhansan is the highest mountain in the suburbs of Seoul, has magnificent geographical features, has been guardian mountain of Seoul from old times, and also was called Sambongsan and Samgaksan because it consists of three peaks. (Sam means three, bong means peak, and gak means angle in Korean) As it says 'celebrated temples are situated in celebrated mountain', Bukhansan houses considerable places sacred to Buddha here and there.

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Dayang Sanghoi was planned as exhibition hall at first, but it is created as private lounge through several changes of plan to office, company training institute, studio, restaurant and cafe for some years. Dayang Sanghoi is a space for client's leisure and party with acquaintances. It also has a stage on mezzanine for performance. Literally, it is a space which can hold every events diversely and keeps the natural feeling as it is.

Therefore, it is named Dayang Sanghoi. (Dayang means diversity in Korean) It can be said that Dayang Shanghoi is an episode of previous project. While I expressed artificial concrete motivated by natural rook at the previous project, dense pine trees in the rocky mountain are the motif of this project. I wanted to show the natural raw materials such as stone and tree as they are.

Artificial nature is doubtedly an imitation. I admitted it is an imitation and wanted it to look like an imitation. Therefore, I aim at fundamental meeting of natural stuff and artificial stuff by showing the processed material property. I placed furnitures unintentionally just like the nature formed without any intentional plan.

Architects : TUNEplanning Location : Pyeongchang-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea Area : 84.47 sqm Project Year : 2013 Photographs : Jeong Taeho

TUNEplanning

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The dense suburban housing in Pangyo-dong, an area 15 minutes south of central Seoul, leaves little room for parks and greenery. Luckily, Jo Jinman Architects designed Layered Terrace House with a built-in solution to this problem; it includes staggered levels, sheltering 17 different rooms and three external terraces and courtyards, slotting everything into a site of just 13 x 17m.

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Eight family members occupy this house, including grandparents, aunt and uncle, father, mother and two young children. Each resident had different requirements and visions of their perfect home; the grandparents, for example, were keen to get a kitchen garden and study, whereas the young family needed a separate living space, playroom and study for the children.

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Constrained by strict planning regulations that dictated going no more than two storeys high, the architects carefully arranged spaces within a multi-layered split level property with a roof terrace. The spacious result feels more like a three-storey house.

User inserted image The design is ‘dynamic and responsive to accommodate a broad range of fixed and changing activities’, explain the architects. Wide maple stairs link the downstairs lounge to the half-floor of bedrooms above – doubling up as cinema seats for a projected screen. Meanwhile the playroom factors in the children’s present height, enabling two levels within a 3.6m high space, but with a removable mezzanine which will transform the space into a master bedroom as they grow up.

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A central courtyard unites all spaces, with interior facades of striped leftover Spruce-Pine-Fir (SPF) creating an intricate timber pattern, which rises up to the roof. Within the rooms, a modest composition of white walls and furnishings, and maple wood floors brings all spaces together, in a continuous layout that cleverly avoids corridors and wasted space.

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The introverted house's elevations are rendered dark grey and feature few openings towards the road. Views are largely focused inwards, on the tranquil hidden courtyard and upper terraces, though small balconies and windows puncture the austere external surface, helping natural cross-ventilation throughout. Structural walls and floor slabs are visible on the external facades, revealing a hint of the internal arrangement.

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Architects: Jo Jinman Architects Location: Bundang, Korea Site Area: 231m² Building area:109m² Completion: 2015 Interior and Furniture: Jo Jinman Architects Design team: Ukee Hong, Cha Seung Yeon, Photograph: Kyungsub Shin All material: Jo Jinman Architects

Jo Jinman Architects

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The Lantern - The literal and mythological meaning of the lantern is highly significant throughout Asian history—it leads you through the dark, showing you the way and indicating the beginning and end of a journey. Neri&Hu’s radical transformation of an existing five storey building in Seoul, South Korea, into a grand flagship store for leading Asian skincare brand Sulwhasoo is inspired by these notions of the lantern.

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The building was designed by Korean architect IROJE and built in 2003. Celebrating the roots of the brand, Neri&Hu wanted to develop a concept with strong connections to Asian culture and traditions, ultimately allowing customers to discover the wealth of Asian wisdom that underpins the Sulwhasoz ethos.

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The concept originates from three key points that were defined at the very start of the project - Identity, Journey and Memory. Neri&Hu aspired to create a space that appeals to all the senses, that captures the customer immediately as they approach the building, creates an experience that continues to unfold during the journey through the store, and leaves a strong impression with visitors long after they have left.

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This is what led to the lantern concept, where a continuous brass structure is the element ties the whole store together, guiding customers while they explore the full extent of the space.

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In creating a series of voids and openings in the building, visitors fully experience the structure as it moves through the space and envelops the different programs. Mirror volumes are inserted into a wooden landscape to reflect and amplify the seemingly endless structure.

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The delicate structure rests upon a solid ground of wide timber floor boards that occasionally rises up to form wooden counters with inserted solid stone blocks, on top of which Sulwhasoo’s products are displayed as precious objects. While it is primarily a guiding mechanism, the lantern structure is also a source of light—hanging within it are custom light fixtures that turn the structure into the main attribute to frame and highlight the products on display.

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Navigating through the five storeys, customers experience changes in atmosphere. The basement spa with its dark brick walls, earthy grey stone treatment rooms and warm crafted wood floors has a sense of intimacy and shelter for visitors. Moving up the building, the material palette becomes lighter and more open, inviting visitors to interact with the space, culminating finally in a roof terrace with its free-flowing brass structure canopy that frames vast views of the surrounding city.

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The journey is a constant contradiction between two counterparts: enclosed to open, dark to light, delicate to massive.The holistic approach to the lantern concept—from space-making to lighting to display to signage—gives visitors a sense of endless intrigue and urges them to explore the spaces and products with passion and delight.

Architects : Neri&Hu Design and Research Office Location : 650, Sinsadong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, South Korea Principals in Charge : Lyndon Neri & Rossana Hu Associate in Charge : Anne-Charlotte Wiklander Area : 1949.0 sqm Project Year : 2016 Photographs : Pedro Pegenaute Manufacturers : Flos, Fritz Hansen, Vitra, e15, Classicon, Roll&Hill, Dela Espada, Carl Hansen, Viabizzuno, Gandia Blasco, Serge Mouille, Mattiazzi, Labo, Kvadrat, Vola, Arne Jacobsen, Stellar works, Parachilna Designers : Sela Lim, Yinan Li, Kailun Sun Senior Associate - Product Design : Brian Lo Associate - Product Design : Nicolas Fardet Senior Associate - Graphic Design : Christine Neri Graphic Designers : Haiou Xin, Litien Poeng

Neri&Hu Design and Research Office







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